Top-10 Papers of 2015

It’s been suggested to me that I should occasionally use this space to list the “top papers” in JGR Space Physics. I did this once but that was a while ago. As 2017 came to a close (on December 30, to be specific), I surfed to Web Of Science and downloaded the citation information with the “publication name” search term “Journal of Geophysical Research Space Physics.” I did this for papers published in a few selected years: 2015, 2012, and 2007; so, 2, 5, and 10 year-old papers. The 2015 papers will be skewed a bit due to the proportionately large age difference from January 2015 to December 2015, but this is a year included in the Journal Impact Factor, so I thought I’d include it here. Also, not all of the 2017 citations to papers are included in WoS yet, especially from papers published late in the year. Still, these citation values are fairly complete and can provide insight into top papers in these years.

Yeah, this is how I spend my Saturday evenings. Don’t worry about me, though, it didn’t take that long.

I’ll spend a few posts here in January analyzing these citation reports. I won’t go into too much detail, as I know that there is a detailed manuscript on this topic in works. Top 10 lists are good to share, though, as are some basic stats on citations for these specific years.

For this first post, here is the list of Top-10 Most Cited Papers published in 2015 in JGR Space Physics:

  1. Kurth et al, Electron densities inferred from plasma wave spectra obtained by the Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, 79 citations
  2. Livadiotis, Introduction to the special section on Origins and Properties of Kappa Distributions: Statistical Background and Properties of Kappa Distributions in Space Plasmas, 53 citations
  3. Astafyeva et al., Ionospheric response to the 2015 St. Patrick’s Day storm: A global multi-instrument overview, 50 citations
  4. Saikin et al., The occurrence and wave properties of H+-, He+-, and O+-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes, 43 citations
  5. Jaynes et al., Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes, 39 citations
  6. Li et al., Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their effects on radiation belt electron dynamics, 35 citations
  7. Saur et al., The search for a subsurface ocean in Ganymede with Hubble Space Telescope observations of its auroral ovals, 33 citations
  8. Engebretson et al., Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time, 32 citations
  9. Li et al., Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity, 31 citations
  10. Ni et al., Resonant scattering of outer zone relativistic electrons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant electron loss time scales, 29 citations

These authors all get a gold star for writing a highly-cited paper:

ctp1804-star-smile-stickers

If you need more gold stars, you can buy them for yourself here, where I got the image.

I am not sure if there are any lessons to learn from this list, but it is fun to share it and commend these authors on a job well done. Here are a couple of other tidbits about the list.

The truly surprising one on this list, at least to me, is #2: the special section preface.  Over 50 citations to a preface in just under 3 years is, well, amazing. If you have a look at it, though, then you will quickly realize that it is a tutorial on the topic of Kappa distributions in space plasmas, with 82 references to papers published in a wide range of years, from 1862 to 2014. It’s really a topical review.

Also, 6 of the 10 are about the Earth’s radiation belts or plasma waves relevant to this particle population. This is not surprising given that, in 2015, NASA’s Van Allen Probes mission was just finishing its prime mission phase, with a full scan of local time of data available for analysis. The continued success of this mission’s data set for scientific discovery has propelled radiation belt papers to the top of this list. The top-cited paper (Kurth et al) is not included in this count of 6 but is related to the topic, being a study of the thermal plasma density in Earth’s inner magnetosphere from this same mission. Because the thermal plasma density is a critical controlling factor for plasma waves and wave-particle interactions, it should probably be added to the count, making it 7 of 10. It was a good year for radiation belt papers.

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