Preprint Servers: Benefits

With the launch of ESSOAr, AGU (and all of the other supporting societies on the advisory board) has entered the market of posting scholarly content prior to official acceptance by a peer-reviewed journal. Yesterday I discussed the “how” of ESSOAr, here I discuss the “why.”

The big reason is to increase scientific communication and collaboration. AGU’s mission is to promote discovery in Earth and space sciences, and many of the society’s honors, medals, and awards cite “unselfish cooperation in research” as a primary criterion for selection. Posting scholarly work to a preprint server increases its visibility and, hopefully, impact within the research community. It gets your findings into the hands of other scientists a bit sooner than normal – a bit closer to when the work was done rather than after months of reviews and revisions. It helps increase the “speed” of scientific discovery, as we learn about what’s new a little bit earlier than we would have from journals alone.

Here is the “why” answer from the ESSOAr FAQ page:

ESSOAr_banner_and_benefits

In addition to a lot of the same arguments I write above, there is an interesting comment in the middle of the paragraph, “You can establish priority.” Rather than the publication date being your time stamp laying claim so some finding, posting on a preprint server establishes that claim a bit sooner.

In a somewhat selfish consideration, the anecdotal evidence that I have heard is that posting your work on a preprint server increases the “early lifetime” citations to the paper. That is, it is thought that the page views and downloads of the preprint leads to faster incorporation of your findings in the work of other scientists, and citations to it therefore should begin a few months sooner. I am not sure how true this is, because the citation rate with year since publication is fairly constant at ~3/year in JGR Space Physics. Furthermore, I am told that the solar physics community extensively uses the arXiv preprint server, yet the journal Solar Physics has a Journal Impact Factor about the same or even slightly lower than JGR Space Physics. In support of preprint servers, I am told the astrophysics community uses arXiv even moreso that solar researchers, and The Astrophysical Journal has a JIF several points higher that the JIF for JGR Space Physics. So, perhaps my awareness of the solar community’s usage of that server is overestimated. This is all speculation, though; we need some quantitative statistics on usage and eventual citations to robustly claim anything. My point is that, while the evidence is mixed about the effectiveness of preprint servers, there is a plausible argument that they should lead to higher citations soon after publication.

Because it s really very little time and effort to upload, I think that it is worth it to do so. I suggest doing this when you submit to the peer-reviewed journal. I haven’t gone through it yet to see it for myself, but I am told that there is a link within the GEMS process for automatically sending the newly-submitted manuscript over to ESSOAr. The trickiest thing about submitting to ESSOAr was the license agreement. There are 4 levels of user licenses available to you. The most lenient is “CC-BY”, for which the only restriction is that users must properly cite it. For my Fall AGU poster, I selected the second level, “CC-BY-NC,” which places the additional constraint of no commercial reuse without my permission. The next level adds a restriction on “derivative use” without permission of the authors. The fourth one is the most restrictive and basically says it can be here on ESSOAr with no other use allowed. Aside from this, the process is very straightforward and easy.

The second step to achieving the full benefits of a preprint server is using ESSOAr as a place to learn about the latest results in your field. This requires signing up for new content alerts. Once you have logged in, conduct a search with some keywords of relevance to you. Once the results are up, then in the upper right area of the page is this:

ESSOAr_followresults

The first link, the magnifying glass with the plus symbol, will “save the search” for you. This opens up a new window where you can name the search and indicate how often you want it to automatically run this for you and send you an alert about it. It looks like this:

ESSOAr_savethissearch

The second symbol opens a page for setting up RSS alerts for the individual posters and preprints found in the search. Actually, both of these links are there regardless of whether you have signed in, you just can’t actually save the search until you log in.

On the page for each poster or preprint in the database, there are two links, “Track Citations” and “Add to Favorites.” The first allows you to get alerts on citations to that specific post, while the second just provides a quick link to that post. These settings, and the saved searches, can all be managed from your profile page. To get there, click on your name in the upper right corner and then on the “Profile” tab. On the new page that loads, the left-column menu has Alerts, Favorites, and Saved Searches.

There isn’t much content available yet – a handful of manuscript preprints and about 50 poster PDFs. If we all collectively start using it, though, then ESSOAr will blossom into a place where space scientists go to learn about the latest work being prepared for publication.

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2 thoughts on “Preprint Servers: Benefits

  1. Pingback: Preprint Servers: Challenges | Notes from the JGR-Space Physics Editor-in-Chief

  2. Pingback: SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER, Volume XXV, Issue 23 - Space Physics and Aeronomy

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