DEI Pledge

As most readers of this blog probably know, JGR Space Physics is a journal of the American Geophysical Union. AGU strives to be a society for Earth and space scientists across the world, but one country is right there in the name…America. In light of recent comments by the President of the United States, I feel compelled to respond with a post. On Martin Luther King Jr. Day here in America, it is a perfect time to push back against racism and other forms of bigotry. I think that silence makes us complicit and I, for one, detest our president’s position.

DEI-Pledge

            When tackling a problem, a diverse workforce brings together many perspectives and makes for a better solution. The USA prides itself on being the world’s melting pot, accepting immigrants from everywhere. A diverse population has helped to make America “Great.” This is exact what the inscription on the Statue of Liberty promotes. Yet, there has always been an undercurrent of racist, bigoted, prejudiced, and/or sexist attitudes in America, with some of the “already privileged” being skeptical and scared of the rise of the “under-privileged.” These feelings are based on ignorance, though. Each time, the rise of an under-privileged group works out well for America. Scientific research, in particular, loves diversity in the workforce.

As a white male of Norwegian descent, I know that I have led a privileged life. I am sure that, who knows how many times, I have benefited from the racism and sexism of others. While I cannot change my past life trajectory, I can steer the future.

So, I pledge to mindfully apply myself towards being a strong supporter of implementing practices at my work and in my daily life that increase diversity, equity, and inclusion. That last phrase is often shortened as DEI. Perhaps you’ve heard that acronym. It’s a good one to know, and I strongly encourage you to adopt a DEI mindset.

For JGR Space Physics authors and reviewers, one way to do this is to practice the Platinum Rule in your interactions with each other and suggest a diverse set of potential reviewers. In the workplace, it can include identifying and confronting Bro Culture and sexist microaggressions. Little by little, we can do a lot.

AGU is working on this too. It has been a strong position of AGU Presidents, and AGU has a Diversity and Inclusion Task Force working right now to review current policy and recommend changes.

            Keep the gates open. Challenge racism, sexism, and bigotry. Promote diversity.

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The New AGU Journals App

AGU and Wiley have just released a new mobile device app for AGU journals. I have now downloaded it and surfed around a bit on it. My quick assessment can be summed up by the neighborhood boy in the movie, The Incredibles: “That was totally wicked!

They have had an app for mobile devices since before I became EiC of JGR Space Physics, and it has even undergone some upgrades. This is an extensive redesign. They have integrated all of the individual journal apps into a single app, and my initial experience with it was fantastic. Here is the sample screen shot they provide about it:

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See the wheel at the bottom? Spin it to select your journal (or swipe left or right on the screen to move one by one). All of AGU’s 20 journals are there now. They also included Eos content in it, too, so you have full access to AGU news and highlights; it’s the Society News entry in the journal wheel (and in the upper left menu).

The image above is the “small device” layout of the app, i.e., for a phone. Here’s another screen shot, from my tablet, showing the “big device” layout of JGR Space Physics page within the app:

AGUjournalsApp-JGRSpace.jpg

I like it bit better on the bigger device but both versions of the app worked well for me.

The app still has the “roaming” feature, which I find extremely convenient. It means that once you initiate a connection through your institution’s network, you will be “logged in” for full access (whatever your institution has) for the next 3 months. When you first open the app, you will get this screen:

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            If you or your institution has a subscription to AGU journals, then click the top button. If you don’t have such access but want to buy it now, then click the second button. If you just want to use the app to read free content (Eos and the Open Access papers in the journals), then click the third button. If you click the first button, then click your method of access, probably either institutional or personal subscription. You will then need to log in to the Wiley Online Library to get access (or create an account, if you have never done this before). A very nice thing about this process is that this roaming set up is now down entirely through the app, at least for me as I configured it this morning. This was not the case before, where we had to use a browser window to go Wiley Online Library to turn on roaming and then go back to the app to complete the roaming connection, all while connected to your institution’s network. You will still have to refresh the roaming every 90 days, which is the inconvenience that we must endure to prevent access fraud and abuse, but this renewal is now much easier.

Once roaming is set up, you can then access AGU journal content through the app as if you were at that subscribing institution, regardless of where you are. This was a powerful feature of the old apps and I am glad that it is still a feature in this new app. I can now log in from home, the coffee shop, or wherever I have wifi access (for my tablet, at least) and read a journal article as if I were in my work office.

I am really looking forward to using this app.

TESS-2018

TESS is back! Yes, it has been 3 years since we had the first Triennial Earth-Sun Summit and, in order to keep the name true, it is time for the next one.

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The official website of the meeting is here, and abstract submissions are now open, with a deadline of Tuesday, February 20.

TESS is a meeting designed to directly appeal to the readership of JGR Space Physics. Organized as a joint meeting of the AGU’s Space Physics and Aeronomy section and the AAS’ Solar Physics Division, it is a chance for our community to have our own meeting that spans the full range of space sciences within the solar system.

There are a lot of special sessions for TESS-2018. There are sessions focused on the Sun and solar atmosphere, the heliosphere, on geospace and near-Earth space weather, some on planetary space environments, and still others that cut across these “regional” boundaries and focus on a fundamental physical process or universal phenomenon. This last group of sessions seeks to draw together the various sub-field communities. There was a big emphasis on this cross-disciplinary theme for the first TESS meeting, and while the speaker lists were great at that conference, the attendance was relatively small (about 400) compared the full number of researchers in our field (several thousand, counting everyone from around the world). One drawback was that the only pre-arranged special sessions were these cross-disciplinary ones. This time, TESS-2018 has many discipline-specific special sessions already on the schedule, which I hope will excite the community and yield a large attendance at the conference. There will also be plenary session talks every morning, with no concurrent sessions in parallel with them. We’ll all be in the same room together for at least part of the every day.

If you are an organizer of one of these special sessions for TESS, then please think seriously about submitting a proposal to JGR Space Physics to organize a special section. I will probably be checking in with you about this before or after the conference.

The meeting is the last full week of May, with sessions scheduled Monday – Thursday, May 21-24 and an icebreaker on Sunday, May 20. The venue is a nice resort hotel in Leesburg, Virginia, a historic town just northwest of Washington, DC. I plan to attend, at least for the first half and perhaps for the full meeting, depending on family travel plans.

Top-10 Papers of 2015

It’s been suggested to me that I should occasionally use this space to list the “top papers” in JGR Space Physics. I did this once but that was a while ago. As 2017 came to a close (on December 30, to be specific), I surfed to Web Of Science and downloaded the citation information with the “publication name” search term “Journal of Geophysical Research Space Physics.” I did this for papers published in a few selected years: 2015, 2012, and 2007; so, 2, 5, and 10 year-old papers. The 2015 papers will be skewed a bit due to the proportionately large age difference from January 2015 to December 2015, but this is a year included in the Journal Impact Factor, so I thought I’d include it here. Also, not all of the 2017 citations to papers are included in WoS yet, especially from papers published late in the year. Still, these citation values are fairly complete and can provide insight into top papers in these years.

Yeah, this is how I spend my Saturday evenings. Don’t worry about me, though, it didn’t take that long.

I’ll spend a few posts here in January analyzing these citation reports. I won’t go into too much detail, as I know that there is a detailed manuscript on this topic in works. Top 10 lists are good to share, though, as are some basic stats on citations for these specific years.

For this first post, here is the list of Top-10 Most Cited Papers published in 2015 in JGR Space Physics:

  1. Kurth et al, Electron densities inferred from plasma wave spectra obtained by the Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, 79 citations
  2. Livadiotis, Introduction to the special section on Origins and Properties of Kappa Distributions: Statistical Background and Properties of Kappa Distributions in Space Plasmas, 53 citations
  3. Astafyeva et al., Ionospheric response to the 2015 St. Patrick’s Day storm: A global multi-instrument overview, 50 citations
  4. Saikin et al., The occurrence and wave properties of H+-, He+-, and O+-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes, 43 citations
  5. Jaynes et al., Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes, 39 citations
  6. Li et al., Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their effects on radiation belt electron dynamics, 35 citations
  7. Saur et al., The search for a subsurface ocean in Ganymede with Hubble Space Telescope observations of its auroral ovals, 33 citations
  8. Engebretson et al., Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time, 32 citations
  9. Li et al., Upper limit on the inner radiation belt MeV electron intensity, 31 citations
  10. Ni et al., Resonant scattering of outer zone relativistic electrons by multiband EMIC waves and resultant electron loss time scales, 29 citations

These authors all get a gold star for writing a highly-cited paper:

ctp1804-star-smile-stickers

If you need more gold stars, you can buy them for yourself here, where I got the image.

I am not sure if there are any lessons to learn from this list, but it is fun to share it and commend these authors on a job well done. Here are a couple of other tidbits about the list.

The truly surprising one on this list, at least to me, is #2: the special section preface.  Over 50 citations to a preface in just under 3 years is, well, amazing. If you have a look at it, though, then you will quickly realize that it is a tutorial on the topic of Kappa distributions in space plasmas, with 82 references to papers published in a wide range of years, from 1862 to 2014. It’s really a topical review.

Also, 6 of the 10 are about the Earth’s radiation belts or plasma waves relevant to this particle population. This is not surprising given that, in 2015, NASA’s Van Allen Probes mission was just finishing its prime mission phase, with a full scan of local time of data available for analysis. The continued success of this mission’s data set for scientific discovery has propelled radiation belt papers to the top of this list. The top-cited paper (Kurth et al) is not included in this count of 6 but is related to the topic, being a study of the thermal plasma density in Earth’s inner magnetosphere from this same mission. Because the thermal plasma density is a critical controlling factor for plasma waves and wave-particle interactions, it should probably be added to the count, making it 7 of 10. It was a good year for radiation belt papers.

More On Plain Language Summaries

For over a year now, AGU has been including the option of a Plain Language Summary with manuscript submissions to any of its journals. This can be about as long as a regular Abstract to your paper, but should be written so that those outside of space physics can understand it. From the AGU text requirements page, the definition goes like this:

“The plain language summary should be written for a broad audience. It should be free of jargon, acronyms, equations and any technical information that would be unknown to the general public. The purpose is to explain the study to the public. A good summary should state the general problem, what was done, and the result.”

This description should be ingrained in all of us, not just those submitting papers in the near future but also anyone reviewing a manuscript for JGR Space Physics or another AGU journal. Yes, if you are asked to review a paper and it has a Plain Language Summary, then please read it and comment on its quality. This should be considered as an essential part of the review process, just like assessing the Key Points and keywords that the authors have provided for the paper.

AGU now has more information about these Plain Language Summaries to help you write a good one. For me, this advice about creating a Plain Language Summary comes down to the final bullet point: take the time to do it right. This is not something that you should crank out during the GEMS submission process. That not only will just be an initial draft of what it could be but also won’t be vetted by your coauthors. Their name is on the paper too, and the Plain Language Summary is published with the paper, right below the official Abstract, so you should definitely include your coauthors in its creation. Please do not just change a few words from your regular Abstract, but instead write it from scratch and edit it to make it appealing to a nonspecialist audience.

Here is the nice graphic from that webpage, by @JoannaScience:

Jargon-Barrier

She did a cartoon for one of my Editors’ Vox articles. This graphic above pretty much sums up how space physics Abstracts are understood by non-space-physicists. Our niche of AGU has to work especially hard at communicating our work to the public; learning how to write a good Plain Language Summary is an excellent start.

AGU has put together a page with some really good Plain Language Summaries. Have a look to see the kind of summary that resonates.

For now, this paragraph is optional, and I have been told that roughly 20% of manuscript submissions include a Plain Language Summary. Writing a good Plain Language Summary, however, greatly increases the chances of your paper being highlighted by AGU in some way. AGU HQ staff read every Plain Language Summary for all accepted papers across all AGU journals. If they come across a good one. At 20%, this is about 5 summaries per day. When they come across a really good one, the paper will, at the very least, receive a social media highlight. They might work with the journal Editor that handled the paper to create an Editors’ Highlight for the paper. Or, it might even be the initial nugget of a Research Spotlight or Editors’ Vox article about the paper. The point is that the paper could be elevated to receive a highlight regardless of what the reviewers and editor thought about its highlight worthiness. If you write a good highlight, then your paper will have an increased chance of receiving special highlight attention from AGU.

While I have not seen stats on whether the various highlighting that AGU does for papers results in more citations, I have seen the stats on page views and full-text downloads, and the link is clear and extremely favorable. Traffic towards the paper is typically greatly enhanced with a highlight. So, it is in your best interest to spend some time on the Plain Language Summary.

 

 

Toolkit for Promoting Your Paper

In the lower-left corner of the Author Resources page is a link called “How to Promote Your Paper.” This page has lots of good advice for authors on this topic. While I have written about the Plain Language Summary before and I probably will again in the near future, there is one thing on this page that I would like to bring to your attention today. It is the Toolkit for Authors on how to improve the impact of your paper. There is even a version in Japanese and perhaps other versions, as well.

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            This 4-page PDF is packed full of advice on how to structure your paper for maximal discoverability. Specifically, it uses the acronym SEO, Search Engine Optimization, and gives you clear advice on things you can do to improve your paper’s chances of rising to the top of an internet search.

Specifically, here is a synopsis of “the 4 easy steps to SEO” as defined in the document:

(1) Keywords: pick 15-20 keywords, avoiding repeats and test them out to see if similar papers are found

(2)Title: keep it to 15 words or fewer and use 2-4 keywords in the first 65 characters

(3) Abstract: place essential things first and focus on a few of the critical keywords

(4) Links: add a link to your paper from your institution’s website and a Wikipedia page

Those are things to do during manuscript preparation or just after acceptance. Once published, then the document suggests that you share a link to your article with friends in the field and even on social media. Not to the point of annoying people, but a quick email to colleagues will improve the changes that some of them will remember it when they write a paper on a similar topic.

Wiley, the publisher of AGU’s journals, wants you to have a successful and highly cited paper, so they offer tools to help with this. For instance, the JGR Space Physics website helps you monitor the impact and reach of your paper. On a paper’s main page, there is a listing of citations to it (as counted by CrossRef) and the article’s Altmetric score. Wiley offers a service called Kudos that will help you write simple language about your paper, share your short blurb, and track its impact in terms of downloads and citations.

Manuscript Submission Webinar, In Chinese

This is for Chinese-speaking researchers who wish to learn more about publishing in AGU journals. Our very own Yuming Wang, Editor of JGR Space Physics, and Minghua Zhang, the Editor in Chief of JGR Atmospheres, were the featured speakers on a webinar now available from AGU. It can be found on the Author Resources page in the section “For International Authors.” It’s the third entry in the section, “Webinar: Tips for a Successful Manuscript Submission [Chinese].” Yes, the webinar is entirely in Mandarin Chinese, not only the speaking but also the text on the screen. The video is an hour and ten minutes long.

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            Note that the link above will eventually take you to a separate page at brighttalk.com, where the webinar is archived. You will have to fill out the form for a free registration in order to watch the video. There are actually two screens of questions, the first is your name and contact information and the second is about you as a researcher. It is very easy and quick to register. You will be asked to make up a password for your registration; this is so that you can go back in to the BrightTALK system and see other webinars available from Wiley and AGU.

I like and respect both of these webinar speakers very much.  Minghua was one of the editors traveling with the AGU Pubs crew on our trip through China in October. He lives in the USA now but he grew up in China and, during that trip, I heard him pass on lots of good advice for authors whose first language is not English. I have now worked with Yuming for four years as an editor of JGR Space Physics. He is very thoughtful and I am sure has plenty of useful tips about manuscript preparation, submission, and publication.

For international authors, writing a manuscript for submission to an AGU journal perhaps can be intimidating and even frustrating. I am glad that AGU sponsors these webinars and I hope that you find it useful.

Free e-Book on Scientific Writing

I have a free e-book for you: Writing Scientific Research Articles by Margaret Cargill and Patrick O’Connor.

Cargill_Writing_Book_Cover

I am not the source, just the conduit. This is compliments of AGU and Wiley. They have little credit-card-sized “coupons” for downloading and accessing a copy of this book. There is a special code on the back of each card coupon, so each person needs their own card. I think; I haven’t actually tested this, because I only needed one copy.

They actually offered this e-book a couple of years ago. I read it, liked it, and took a bunch of notes. I should pass some of the key points on to you here in this blog. Well, I have, but not specifically as a recap of this book. If you would like the full version from the original authors, then please find me here in New Orleans at the Fall AGU Meeting. I have a small stack of these cards in my pocket. I can probably get more if I run out.

As a teaser, the section headings:

Section 1: A framework for success – typical research article structures

Section 2: When and how to write each article section – a method for writing the first draft

Section 3: Getting your manuscript published – submitting and resubmitting

Section 4: Developing your writing and publication skills further – specialized writing topics, strategies, and advice

Section 5: Provided example articles – for reference, called out throughout the book

I liked the book a lot and found myself agreeing with nearly everything they suggest. I highly recommend it. Find me and I’ll give you a coupon card.

Giving Tuesday 2017

Today has been designated Giving Tuesday, at least here in the USA. This comes on the heels of Thanksgiving Thursday, Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber Monday. I’m not quite sure why Sunday was skipped over; a leftover from a bygone time when stores were not open on Sundays, I guess.

Many non-profit organizations are using today as a special 24-hour publicity campaign to raise funds. AGU is one of those organizations. You can find out more about their particular campaign here.

AGU-givingday2017

That link takes you to the main page about the Giving Day campaign; the direct page for individual donations is here.

I am not paid by AGU to make this announcement; I do it because I believe in what AGU does for our research community. I personally like to give to several of the accounts listed in the “student” and “special” funds categories on the “donate” page. Unfortunately, the website is set up to select only one fund from each category, so if you want to give to more than one fund in a category, then you have to do a separate order for each. It’s fast, though.

I’ve talked about this a number of times. AGU used to have it on the Thursday during the Fall AGU Meeting, but now they’ve moved it to align with the national Giving Day event. There are lots of good funds to which you can designate your donation, including some specifically for space physics, like the new Maha Ashour-Abdalla Scholarship. And yes, AGU still has the incentive program that provides extra funds to the section leadership, depending on the percentage of membership in that section that make above-normal-membership donations to AGU (of any size into any fund).

Donating to AGU doesn’t influence the publications process; it will have essentially no effect on JGR Space Physics. It will not help your paper get published. It does, however, have big importance to the “extra” things that AGU does for our community, like travel grants for students and those in developing countries, outreach and public engagement to increase scientific literacy and awareness, and prize money like the Basu, Scarf, and OSPA awards.

Open Special Sections of JGR-Space

Here’s a public service announcement for the special sections that are open to new submissions at JGR Space Physics right now. If you have an idea for a special section, then please feel free to contact any of the editors and, when you are ready to propose, please fill out the form. There’s nothing quite like a deadline to motivate the community to finalize and write up their findings.

JGRSpaceCallForPapers

Dayside Magnetosphere Interactions

            Submission deadline: 30 November 2017

This special collection addresses the processes by which solar wind mass, momentum, and energy enter the magnetosphere. Regions of interest include the foreshock, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and cusps, the dayside magnetosphere, and both the dayside polar and equatorial ionosphere. Results from spacecraft observations (e.g., MMS, Cluster, Geotail, THEMIS, and Van Allen Probes), ground-based observations (all-sky camera, radar, and magnetometer), MHD, hybrid and PIC simulations are all included. Parallel processes occur at other planets, and recent results from NASA’s MAVEN mission to Mars, as well as ESA’s Mars and Venus Express missions are also included.

Mars Aeronomy

            Submission deadline: 5 January 2018

The Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and solar-wind interactions are becoming increasingly important for understanding loss of atmosphere to space and the evolution of the Martian climate.  Recent observations have been made from Mars Express over the last decade, from MAVEN for the most-recent Mars year, and from Mars Odyssey, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the Mars Orbiter Mission; landed spacecraft and earlier orbiters also provided valuable information. The International conference on Mars Aeronomy held in May 2017 in Boulder, Co, USA brought together all aspects of Mars aeronomy, including pertinent observations, analyses, theoretical models and results. The proposed special issue will collect the papers presented at the conference as well as will be open to all relevant manuscripts about the Mars upper atmosphere and space environment, even if the authors did not attend the conference. This collection is a joint special section between JGR-Space Physics and JGR-Planets, so the authors can submit manuscripts to either journal. The submission deadline is 5 January 2018.

Science and Exploration of the Moon, Near-Earth Asteroids, and the Moons of Mars

            Submission deadline: 31 January 2018

This special collection, sponsored by NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) invites papers focusing on the science and exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, and the moons of Mars. We invite contributions covering topics including, but not limited to, geologic investigations, dust/exosphere/plasma environments, surface remote sensing studies, field analog studies, laboratory analyses, and geophysical modeling relevant to the bodies of interest. In addition, we invite contributions focusing on efforts to prepare for future human exploration of these bodies. Special collection submissions can be submitted to JGR-Planets, JGR-Space Physics, Earth and Space Science, or GeoHealth. Potential authors do not need to be members of a SSERVI team to submit a paper to this special collection.